3 Ways We Leave A Legacy, So Make It A Great One!

Photo from City of Boston Archives

Photo from City of Boston Archives

Legacy Building

What do all second term U.S. Presidents and failed, former Presidents have in common? They are all on a quest to build a unique legacy for which they will be remembered in the history books after they have passed away.

The reason I know this? At the time of this writing, we still have alive with us the longest surviving/retired former President and perhaps greatest example of legacy rebuilding: Jimmy Carter. Since leaving office in January 1981, Mr. Carter has been working extremely hard on rebuilding a failed Presidential, personal legacy. He has been busy doing amazing charity work with Habitat For Humanity. He also founded The Carter Center whose mission is “guided by a fundamental commitment to human rights and the alleviation of human suffering; it seeks to prevent and resolve conflicts, enhance freedom and democracy, and improve health.”

But, who can blame former President Carter for working so hard on building a better personal legacy post 1981? President Carter has been branded as one of the worst presidents, especially in recent history. Here’s how Wikipedia records his presidential legacy:

The Independent writes, “Carter is widely considered a better man than he was a president.” While he began his term with a 66 percent approval rating, his had dropped to 34 percent approval by the time he left office, with 55 percent disapproving …

… His administration suffered from his inexperience in politics. Carter paid too much attention to detail. He frequently backed down from confrontation and was quick to retreat when attacked by political rivals. He appeared to be indecisive and ineffective, and did not define his priorities clearly. He seemed to be distrustful and uninterested in working with other groups, or even with Congress when controlled by his own party, which he denounced for being controlled by special interest groups. Though he made efforts to address many of these issues in 1978, the approval he won from his reforms did not last long.

In the 1980 campaign, Ronald Reagan projected an easy self-confidence, in contrast to Carter’s serious and introspective temperament. Carter’s personal attention to detail, his pessimistic attitude, his seeming indecisiveness and weakness with people were accentuated in contrast to Reagan’s charismatic charm and delegation of tasks to subordinates. Reagan used the economic problems, Iran hostage crisis, and lack of Washington cooperation to portray Carter as a weak and ineffectual leader. Carter was the first elected president since Hoover in 1932 to lose a reelection bid.

Ouch! When Wikipedia writers write that about your Presidency, you would be busy rebuilding your legacy, too!

Good And Bad, We’re All Leaving A Legacy

Will President Carter really be able to ditch the legacy of his failed presidency? Unfortunately for him, no, he won’t. But, we will all be able to look back and see that he has done some amazing work after leaving office. He didn’t just roll over, give up, and go on vacation for the last 32+ years. He wanted to make a difference after leaving office, and he certainly has accomplished his mission.

All of us are leaving a legacy each day. Some days, I’m sure our legacy looks amazing. On other days, probably not so much. But, we all have a daily opportunity to leave a legacy to those around us through what we say, through what we do, and through what we give.

3 Ways To Leave An Amazing Legacy, Today

We leave a legacy by what we:

  1. SAY. Our words have an impact on those around us. Proverbs 15:1-2, 4 says, “A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. The tongue of the wise adorns knowledge, but the mouth of the fool gushes folly. The soothing tongue is a tree of life, but a perverse tongue crushes the spirit.” We have to be so careful with the words that come out of our mouths! Just remember that people will remember those words and attitudes behind your words. Maintain a positive, loving attitude with the words you choose! Also, related to this area, we live in an amazing time in history where we can leave our very own personal words to succeeding generations through written digital documents, as well as audio and video recordings. I don’t know about you, but I know little to nothing about my grandfathers and great-grandparents. I think it would be a really amazing to hear their voices and see them on a video recording. I would love it if they had compiled some Jones history in their personal journals. In today’s digital world, you have an amazing opportunity to leave a part of yourself to the next generation!
  2. DO. Our actions really do speak louder than our words. 1 John 3:17-18 tells us, “If anyone has material possessions and sees a brother or sister in need but has no pity on them, how can the love of God be in that person? Dear children, let us not love with words or speech but with actions and in truth.” It’s easy to tell people that we love them and that we’re praying for them. It’s hard, though, to take the time out of our busy schedules and help others. When we do, though, this is what people ultimately remember about us. Be proactive and take time today by loving others through your actions.
  3. GIVE. We will be remembered for what we gave while here on this earth: our time, our talents, and our treasure. Proverbs 13:22 states, “A good person leaves an inheritance for their children’s children, but a sinner’s wealth is stored up for the righteous.” If we claim to be a follower of Christ, then our lives should look like His. Our Lord was the ultimate giver; He gave His very life for us! Give of your time and energy to your spouse, kids, and friends. They will definitely recall the time you spent with them after you have gone on to be with the Lord. Give financially to your church and those in need. Also, be proactive in setting up your estate planning to give financially to both your earthly and spiritual families when you pass from this life to the next.

Questions: So, how’s your legacy building going? Like former President Jimmy Carter, have you been diligent in creating a better legacy?

The best legacy building happens proactively, on purpose. Don’t forget to both say AND do, today! Write stuff down regarding your family history. Compile all your writing journals, audio and video recordings and keep them in a secure location. Keep your legacy legal documents up to date. Leave an amazing legacy of love to those you leave behind.

Why You Should Become A Writer

Photo by Jeffrey James Pacres

Photo by Jeffrey James Pacres

Writers Make Their Mark

Great minds read books. Great minds also write books. If you think back across history, many of our most memorable historical figures were writers.

From Biblical history, I think of Moses, King David, King Solomon, and the Apostle Paul. These men were some of the greatest minds of their respective eras and wrote the majority of the canonical Bible.

Outside of Biblical history, I’m reminded of the respective geniuses of people such as Plato, Homer, Plutarch, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Chaucer, Tolstoy, and Mark Twain.

Why Are Writers So Great?

Writers are, for the most part, highly analytical thinkers. They think about the era in which they live. They consider their place in history in a big, multi-cultural world. They bring a unique perspective to life in their time and place in this world through the lens of culture, family, religion, upbringing, and political leanings.

Writers are typically very disciplined. Some of the greatest writers carve time out of their schedules each day to write. They understand that they need to just show up everyday and write something. One day it may only be 100 words. Another day it may be 1,000. The key though is to keep plugging away at this writing thing. There will be times of great productivity and other times of drought. Great writers discipline themselves to show up each day and pray for inspiration to produce an amazing product.

Because writers tend to be so analytical and disciplined, we can get a view of their world at the time of their writing. We are in essence looking at a snapshot of the mind and the times of the writer in their era.

Clear writing is also evidence of clear thinking. Great writers know what to omit. They understand that they need to edit and re-write to bring clarity to their writing. Of course, not all writing is this way (for example, journals), but the majority of final product writing has been written, edited, and re-written several times.

Why Write?

There are a number of great reasons to be a writer.

One, writing helps clarify your thinking. I know that when I tend to struggle with problems, I find myself journaling and perhaps even writing blog posts on subjects I’m wrestling with. Writing is a great way get all your thoughts out of your head and investigate possible solutions.

Two, writing can instill self-discipline. Setting up a time each day to write can bring discipline to other areas of your life. I know this has been true in my own life. It takes effort to wake up early in the morning and tackle a project such as writing first thing. But, I love it. I enjoy the discipline and process of writing. I look forward to my alarm going off at 4:30am so I can start writing.

Three, writing can leave a legacy to those you care about it. Whenever the Lord decides to take me home to be with Him, my immediate as well as extended family will have a lot of “me” to sift through. I’ve written 2-3 blogs worth of material. I’ve written several journals. I’ve written one e-book to date. If my children want to know the “real Larry Jones,” then all they need to do is read my writing. I can’t think of a greater gift to give your children and grandchildren: a peek into your mind through your own personal writing.

Four, writing could lead to a different career path. I believe there’s a growing trend to hire good writers for any number of positions. In the book Rework by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson, we read the following:

“If you are trying to decide among a few people to fill a position, hire the best writer. It doesn’t matter if that person is a marketer, salesperson, designer, programmer, or whatever; their writing skills will pay off” (p. 222).

Questions: So, are you a writer? Have you ever considered becoming a writer? If you are a writer, how long have you been a writer? What tangible benefits have you discovered by being a writer?

Rework


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