Just Good Enough Doesn’t Cut It In The Area Of Giving

Photo by Jay Nungesser

In A Hot Pursuit of Excellence

Have you ever discovered something in life that really captures your interest?

Something that consumes your thoughts? Something that drives you to spend more time, energy, and resources on that one thing? That one thing you want to be excellent in above all other things?

When I was a young man, playing the trumpet was my one thing. My parents and I poured our “extra” time, energy, and financial resources into my fledgling music career.

I practiced at least three hours a day. My parents and I travelled across town 45 minutes in each direction in order for me to take trumpet lessons once a week. I played in three different area civic orchestras which not only took rehearsal time to participate in each week, but lots of travel time and personal energy as well.

We spent money on gas getting from one music activity to another. We spent money on lessons. We spent money on music, new trumpets, accessories, and repairs. We spent thousands upon thousands of dollars in a hot pursuit of excellence for me to be the best trumpet player I could be.

Have you ever had one thing that has driven you to attempt to be the best at in this life?

Excellence In Giving

Have you ever considered that God wants us as Christians to be excellent in the area of giving? With that same passion, drive, and energy that we put into our own pursuits, God wants us to put that into giving as well.

In 2 Corinthians 8:7, we read these words written by the Apostle Paul to the church at Corinth:

But since you excel in everything—in faith, in speech, in knowledge, in complete earnestness and in the love we have kindled in you—see that you also excel in this grace of giving.

The word excel used in this verse carries with it the idea of abounding or overflowing. Excellence in giving means we aren’t just meeting the minimum requirements. We are going above and beyond the minimum.

Paul tells these Corinthian Christians that they are excellent in a lot of important areas. They are putting in a lot of time, energy, and resources into other areas of their Christian walk – faith, speech, knowledge, earnestness, and love. He reminds them to put that same kind of passion, that same type of enthusiastic energy into the area of giving.

In the eyes of God, good enough doesn’t cut it when it comes to this area of giving.

Questions: So, how about you? Are you excelling in this grace of giving? If not, why not? What do you need to do to start excelling in this area of your life?

See my Giving Talk Video below where I addressed this same issue:

Do You Act Like A Little Kid When It Comes To Giving?

Photo by Worapol Sittiphaet

Photo by Worapol Sittiphaet

“No” and “Mine”

I have four daughters.

Yes, there’s a lot of estrogen flowing at my house, and this daddy is a big sap with his girls.

At the time of this writing, my third daughter, Katelynn, is 22 months old. She is quite the little chatterbox at this stage in life, and she has two favorite words right now. You may even be able to guess what they are!

The first word is “NO.” The second word is “MINE.”

Did mommy and daddy teach her these words? Well, not intentionally at least. This is simply the human condition, our sin nature, at work.

So, this is typically what happens at the Jones’ house. Katelynn will get a hold of something as simple as my car keys. I will politely and lovingly ask her for my keys back, because I need them. And, what do you think the first two words are out of her mouth?

Of course, her two new favorite words – No and Mine! And then, she doesn’t want to obey daddy and give them back. I end up in a little wrestling match with this sweet, little adorable girl to get my keys back! Once I have them yanked out of her hands, she has a meltdown.

We Can Act Like Little Kids, Too!

I know this is a fun and adorable story about my little girl, but unfortunately, the sad reality is that this happens with us as adults too.

God has richly blessed us. He has given us money, talents, abilities, food, cars, clothes, and houses that He ultimately wants us to use for His glory.

Then, the Holy Spirit taps us on the shoulder and says, “Hey, Larry. I’d really appreciate if you would give at least 10% of your income on a consistent basis.” Or maybe He says, “I’d really like you to cook a meal and take it to a family that needs help.” Or, “I’d like you to give a few dollars to that homeless guy on the corner.”

But, we end up just like my daughter Katelynn. We take ownership of what is already God’s to begin with and those two favorite words come spilling out of our mouths, “No, God. Mine!”

God’s Word teaches us that everything belongs to Him to begin with. In Psalm 24:1, we read these words:

“The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it.”

See my Giving Talk Video below where I addressed this same issue:

Questions: What is God asking you to give, today? Why haven’t you given it to Him, yet?

3 Ways My Parents Taught Me To Love God And His Church

FBR t-shirtLoving His Church

In the month of September, my church has been celebrating our love for our church. We’ve been wearing special “I love my church” T-shirts on Saturdays all around the Metro Kansas City area. We’ve been taking “selfies” of ourselves wearing these T-shirts around town. We’ve been writing social media posts about why we love our church. We’ve even been hashtagging our love on social media with the hashtag #loveFBR on these posts and pictures.

As we have celebrated our love for our church over the last few weeks, I’ve been reflecting back on my childhood and how I learned to love any church I’ve ever been a member.

The reason I love God and His church is primarily due to the example of my parents. As a boy growing up in my parents’ home, I learned to love my church through watching my parents love their church in 3 ways.

3 Ways My Parents Loved Their Church

  1. They gave of their time. They viewed church attendance as a priority, so anytime the church doors were open, we were there. On Wednesday nights, we were there for Awana ministry. On Sunday mornings, we were there for Sunday School and worship service. We would go back for Sunday night services. We also would also attend special missions conferences and revivals (remember those?). And now, as an adult, I’m at church almost every day, because I work for a mega church!
  2. They gave of their talents and abilities. My dad is an artist – he paints and sculpts, and he used those talents to help the church on various projects. He also served as a club leader in the Awana program. I can still remember him wearing his uniform and us kids having to wear those bright red neckerchiefs and the little plastic slides that held them in place. My dad also drove a bus for bus ministry, picking up kids and bringing them to church. My mom is a singer, and she sang solos as well as sang in the choir. She gave me a love and passion for using my musical abilities to serve God and His church in worship.
  3. They gave of their financial resources. My parents taught me how to give at the level of 10% of my income and beyond. Every week, my parents would write their check, place it in a giving envelope, and take their envelope with them to church and drop it in the offering plate. Now, as an adult in an age of electronic giving, my tithes and offerings are automatically given online each week.

In Romans 12:6-8 (NIV), we read these words:

We have different gifts, according to the grace given to each of us. If your gift is prophesying, then prophesy in accordance with your faith; if it is serving, then serve; if it is teaching, then teach; if it is to encourage, then give encouragement; if it is giving, then give generously; if it is to lead, do it diligently; if it is to show mercy, do it cheerfully.

We demonstrate our love for God and His church through giving of our time, talents, and finances.

See my Giving Talk Video below where I addressed this same issue:

Questions: Do you demonstrate your love for God and His church on a consistent basis? Are you giving faithfully of your time, talents, and finances? What talents and abilities has God given you that you could invest back into His Kingdom?

What’s The Big Deal About Christian Financial Stewardship Anyway?

Photo by Paval Hadzinski

Photo by Paval Hadzinski

The Light Comes On For Me, Over Time

Stewardship.

Yeah, it’s a weird word. It’s a churchy word, too. Not many people really get it, either.

Twenty years ago, I would associate the word “stewardship” to tithing on Sunday mornings and church building campaigns. That’s what I thought it was all about.

Then, I attended my first Crown Financial Bible Study Class back around 2001-2002, and the light of understanding slowly began to come on as I learned what God’s Word had to say about financial matters. I learned that “my money” was not mine at all. Everything that I possess has been given to me by Almighty God to manage for His kingdom purposes.

This is the core essence of Christian stewardship. As believers, we are called by God to manage the time, money, abilities, and relationships He has given us. We aren’t supposed to squander all these resources on selfish, fleshly desires.

Here’s an excellent synopsis of stewardship taken from Wikipedia:

A biblical world view of stewardship can be consciously defined as: “Utilizing and managing all resources God provides for the glory of God and the betterment of His creation.” The central essence of biblical world view stewardship is managing everything God brings into the believers’ life in a manner that honors God and impacts eternity.

Stewardship begins and ends with the understanding of God’s ownership of all.

After I went through the Crown Financial Bible study, I ran across this blueish-green book in a local book store called Financial Peace by some guy named Dave Ramsey, who I had never heard of before. I’m reading through this book thinking to myself, “this guy makes a lot of sense. Debt is dumb. I need to get my family out of debt with gazelle intensity!” As a result of reading Dave’s book, I started listening to his syndicated radio show and eventually began coordinating Financial Peace University at my church.

All of these baby steps in the area of Christian stewardship eventually led me to take on a secondary role in my church as our Stewardship Pastor. It has certainly been an exciting as well as interesting journey as I have grown in stewardship in my own life and have attempted to teach it to others.

Why Stewardship?

So, why should stewardship be such a big deal in the life of a believer, anyway?

I believe there are several answers to this question.

First, the Bible is filled with financial wisdom and instruction. The estimates on the amount of financial verses in the Bible range from 900 to over 2,000 depending on your criteria. Needless to say, that’s a lot of Bible verses on money!

Second, Jesus Himself spoke a lot about money in the parables He taught the Jewish people. In fact, money was (possibly) His second most discussed topic with the Kingdom of God being the first. There is much theological debate on which parables dealt specifically with the topic of money, but money was a huge issue that Jesus addressed frequently in His ministry here on earth.

Third, money is one of the biggest areas of struggle for most believers. Unfortunately, the majority of Christians have adopted cultural beliefs and practices when it comes to money. Most of us have either forgotten or never been taught Biblical financial principles.

Fourth, stewardship is about more than money. The more I study and practice the principles of Biblical stewardship, the more I understand this important principle. It really encompasses every aspect of your life – your time, natural talents, abilities, money, assets, physical health, and relationships.

My Take

Here’s my own personal take on this area of stewardship. If God’s Word is filled with financial wisdom and Jesus’ own ministry focused a lot of time teaching on money management, then there are certainly good reasons for this instruction. This is an area that the Lord knows we all struggle and need to work on in our life on a continual basis. It’s not a “one and done” kind of deal, either. Stewardship is a life long pursuit.

Every day, we have to surrender our selfish, greedy financial plans and desires over to our Lord and Savior. Our primary concern should be using the resources God has entrusted to our management to advance His Kingdom here on earth and in heaven.

Questions: Do you think stewardship should be a big deal in the life of a believer? Why or why not? Is stewardship a big deal in your own life and the life of your family?

Why Some People Have An Easier Time Giving Consistently Over Others

Photo by 401(k) 2012

Photo by 401(k) 2012

The Excuses

“Larry, I wish I could give more.”

“I wish I could give at the level of ten percent of my income, but things are really tight in my family. You know how I had to take a cut in pay last year? I’m also having to help out a friend in real financial need right now. That’s kind of like tithing, right? Me helping out my friend could count toward my tithe to God, couldn’t it?”

If I had a dollar every time I had a conversation similar to this, I could build up a sizeable love offering for my church!

And while helping out friends in need is a noble deed, I can’t say that those financial gifts can “count” toward the tithe according to God’s Word. God makes it pretty clear that we are to bring His tithe and offerings into the “storehouse” [Malachi 3:10]. In the Old Testament, the storehouse equaled the tabernacle, temple, or synagogue. In the New Testament, the storehouse equals the local church that you attend.

An Easier Way To Giving Consistently

In the area of giving, some people seem to have an easier time giving consistently at the level of ten percent and beyond.

After counseling with people on personal finance issues over the last few years, I believe there are two main reasons some people have an easier time giving back to God and His church than others:

  1. They have a monthly spending plan. You know, the dreaded B word, a “Budget.” They give each dollar a name and tell each dollar what to do.
  2. They make giving to God and His church a priority in their lives. Their offerings are listed at the top of their budget form each and every month. They give God the very best of the “firstfruits” of their income [Proverbs 3:9].

I know in my own family, we have learned important Biblical financial principles – how to give, save, and spend – through ministry programs such as Financial Peace University and Crown Financial. God has blessed us in amazing ways as we have followed what His Word teaches us regarding financial matters.

All this Biblical financial stuff really does work!

In my own personal experience, giving at the level of the tithe can be relatively pain-free if you have a financial plan, if you make giving a priority in your life, and then if you follow through with your planned gift.

Execution of that plan is key!

A great way you can demonstrate your love for God and His Church is through having a financial plan and establishing giving as a priority in your life.

Isaiah 32:8 tells us, “But he who is generous plans generous things, and on generous things he stands.”

See my Giving Talk Video below where I addressed this exact issue:

Questions: Do you have an easy time giving consistently at the level of ten percent? If not, why not? Do you have a monthly financial plan? Have you established giving as a priority in your life?

How To Do More With Less

Illustration by Chris Piascik

Illustration by Chris Piascik

Fewer Resources In A Difficult Economy

Money is tight.

I seriously doubt that statement is too much of a shock to any of my readers.

In the early to mid 2000s, money flowed fast and cheap. People took advantage of the financial system, and then ended up in a world of hurt when the economy slowed way down.

For the last six years, we have lived in challenging economic times. Some people have struggled more than others. Some have been able to successfully make the transition over to surviving and even thriving on less, financially.

Somehow, these people have been able to take a little money and stretch it further than what is even considered possible.

Jesus Transforms The Little Into Much

In the Book of John, Chapter 6, we read the story of Jesus feeding the 5,000.

This accounting was for 5,000 men and didn’t count all the women and children. So, the “real” people count may have been more like 15,000-20,000.

Jesus had taught all day on a mountainside near the Sea of Galilee, and this crowd of people listening to Him was getting hungry.

Jesus went to the disciples and asked them to find food for these 5,000 men, plus the women and children present as well.

One of the disciples, Phillip, told Him, “Lord, there’s no way we can afford to feed all these people. It would cost nearly half a year’s wages.” In today’s numbers, this could equal around $20,000.

Another disciple, Andrew, found a boy with a Jewish Happy Meal – five loaves of bread and two small fish. This boy had a $7 lunch. Andrew thought this amount of food was simply a waste of time. He had a scarcity mindset.

But Jesus didn’t think this way.

He had the people sit down. He took this small amount of food, he gave thanks for it, and he blessed it. Then the disciples distributed these five loaves and two small fish to the people.

In John 6:12-13, we read these words:

When they had all had enough to eat, he said to his disciples, “Gather the pieces that are left over. Let nothing be wasted.” So they gathered them and filled twelve baskets with the pieces of the five barley loaves left over by those who had eaten.

In this amazing miracle by Jesus, we see Him taking a small amount of food, blessing it, and multiplying it to the point that all the people’s physical hunger was satisfied, PLUS they had more than enough leftover.

Abundance Thinking

Jesus had an abundance mindset.

This makes total sense, though. He is God the Son. He owns it all! All resources are at his disposal at any time and any place.

When the disciples brought him the five loaves and two fish to feed thousands of people, He didn’t throw up his hands in frustration and give up.

Instead, He prayed.

He thanked God for the resources that were before Him. He prayed a blessing on the loaves and fishes, and then what happened?

God multiplied the resources and then there was more than enough to feed the people. In fact, there were HUGE amounts of leftovers after the people ate until they were full.

You can do more with less. When God is in something, little can be much.

Questions: Do you, like the disciples, struggle with scarcity thinking, or do you have an abundance mindset? Do you look to God as your ultimate provider of resources? When you come to the time of offering in your church, do you think that you don’t have enough financially to make any kind of impact in the Kingdom of God? Do you think that your giving would be a waste of time and resources?

Key Thought: Whether you have a little or a lot, it doesn’t matter. Be like this boy who obeyed Jesus, gave away his small lunch to the Master, and the Lord blessed these few resources in an amazing way!

Give Like An Angel Investor, Not A Venture Capitalist

Photo by Kim Seng

Photo by Kim Seng

Shark Tank Reminded Me

Have you ever seen the TV show “Shark Tank?”

If you aren’t familiar with the show, here’s an excellent description from Wikipedia:

The show features a panel of potential investors, called “sharks”, who consider offers from aspiring entrepreneurs seeking investments for their business or product. The entrepreneur can make a deal on the show if a panel member is interested. However, if all of the panel members opt out, the entrepreneur leaves empty handed. The show is said to portray “the drama of pitch meetings and the interaction between the entrepreneurs and tycoons.” A one hour pitch by a contestant is edited down to “a dramatic 10 minute segment”. The show is said to personalize “the desperation and pain experienced by victims of a broken down economy.”

I was watching the show several weeks ago, and I was reminded of the various types of investors. In the world of small business start-up investing, there are essentially two types: venture capitalists and angel investors.

Let’s look a little more closely at these two types of investors.

Venture Capitalists And Angel Investors

There are a couple of key differences between these two types of investors.

Venture capitalists are mostly concerned with making money. They typically invest a lot of money and they are hoping for a substantial return on their investment. For the venture capitalist, it’s all about the money – give a lot and make a lot!

Angel investors, however, handle their investing a little differently.

Yes, just like venture capitalists, they invest a lot of money and are interested in a return on that investment. But, their primary interests are in the people who started the company as well as the success of the business in which they’re investing.

They really like the person who started the business and want this person to be successful. They also really like the business model that this entrepreneur has created and want the business itself to be successful.

You see, for an angel investor, it’s not all about the money. The financial return on investment process is almost like a bonus to them.

Giving Like An Angel Investor

In Matthew 6:31-33, Jesus told His followers,

So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.

As believers, I think it’s way too easy to fall into a “give to get” mentality, much like the venture capitalist. Yes, many times God does richly bless those who give faithfully and abundantly, but this shouldn’t be our primary concern.

I believe our motive to give should be like that of an angel investor.

First, we have a unique relationship with God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we should love the Lord with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength. This is the “people” part of angel investing.

Second, as children of God, we should have a deep personal interest and desire for the Kingdom of God to be successful. This is the “business” part of angel investing.

One way we can demonstrate this love for God and desire for Kingdom success is by giving back to our local church a portion of what He has given to us to manage.

And, the bonus for us as believers is that God promises to take care of our needs when we put Him and His Kingdom as our number one priority.

See my Giving Talk Video below where I addressed this same issue:

Questions: Have you ever thought about giving in terms of small business investing? How have you given in the past, like a venture capitalists or angel investor? Do you give because you are looking for a financial blessing, or because you love God and want His Kingdom to succeed?

How An iPad Changed My Perspective On Heavenly Treasures

iPad 1 photoMy Pride And Joy

In August 2009, I made a significant financial purchase.

I bought my very first iPad, a first generation Apple iPad. The cost was around $500.

For several months, I worked hard and saved any extra money I could. I even did some additional side work in order to save up enough money to buy this amazing new technology that Apple produced.

For at least a year or two, this iPad 1 was my pride and joy. I took it with me everywhere. I used it for everything.

Then, of course, Apple had the audacity to build newer and better iPads (what seemed to be every 6 months), making my glorious iPad 1 practically obsolete. Now five years later in 2014, you can go online to websites such as Craigslist and buy this same iPad for around $100-150. This tablet computer has depreciated greatly in value over time.

Ultimately, though, the materials used in this iPad will end up in a landfill or be recycled into another product.

Jesus And Our Treasures

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus talked about our treasures and their value in this life and the next.

He said in Matthew 6:19-21,

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is there your heart will be also.”

Jesus gives us three key thoughts in these verses.

First, earth is a bad location to store our treasures. They will decay over time, plus there is the potential for theft.

Second, heaven is a better place to store our treasures. They will never decay here, or ever be stolen.

Third, our hearts follow our treasures. When we are consumed about our earthly treasure, our hearts are concerned with a temporal earth. God wants us to store up treasure in heaven so that our heart is focused on heaven. If we are believers, this is our ultimate destination, our eternal home.

So, Where’s Your Treasure?

Isn’t it ironic that we as believers in Christ often devote so much time, attention and money into the things that rust and perish? But, we ignore those things that truly last forever.

May I ask you this question, where is your treasure? Are you perhaps more concerned financially in earthly things such as cars, iPads, computers, phones or houses? These items lose their monetary value over time and will eventually be destroyed.

Or, are you investing in eternity? A great way to invest in eternity is by giving back to the Lord what He has entrusted to us through the weekly offerings of your local church.

The old saying goes that we can’t take it with us, but we can send it on ahead.

See my Giving Talk Video below where I addressed this same issue:






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Does The Bible Really Contain A Secret Money Code?

Photo by Susan Kambalu

Photo by Susan Kambalu

Sean Hyman And The Biblical Money Code

His advertisements are everywhere!

Over the last few months, it seems like anytime I have my local talk radio station on, Fox News, or simply browsing the web, I keep running into advertisements for Sean Hyman’s Biblical Money Code.

A few weeks ago, I was curious enough to just go ahead and purchase the lowest subscription possible to check out what all the hype is on this Biblical Money Code book is all about.

Buying The Biblical Money Code book is really more of an opportunity for you to end up on an email subscription to the Ultimate Wealth Report plus NewsMax.com. Of course, this is the new normal in today’s digital marketing age, so now I am blessed with at least two to three extra emails cluttering up my inbox each day!

But, you do also receive several ebooks and other pieces of financial information for your purchase. It’s not a complete “bait and switch.”

Who Is Sean Hyman?

Sean Hyman is a former pastor who has allegedly moved from making $15,000 a year to now giving away up to $50,000 a year. He didn’t make this kind of money in church work, however! Here’s a portion of Sean’s bio regarding his financial work:

Sean Hyman has become a trusted correspondent on CNBC, Fox Business and Bloomberg due to his extensive background in the financial markets, having spent more than 20 years in the investing trenches. Over that time, he’s been a stockbroker at Charles Schwab, a trading course instructor for foreign exchange market maker Forex Capital Markets (FXCM), a financial writer for numerous outlets, and a key speaker at conferences both nationally and internationally. Over the course of his career Hyman has also held five financial licenses …

… Sean Hyman became the editor of the Ultimate Wealth Report newsletter because he loves teaching and helping others to have a better life than what they’d had before. His goal with the Ultimate Wealth Report is “to shepherd readers in the right direction so their wealth doesn’t get eaten away by inflation, but rather benefits from the rise of inflation.”

A Fast Overview Of The Six Keys

The primary ebook focused on the Biblical Money Code that you receive as part of your subscription is called The Six Keys To Financial Success. Like many ebooks you receive online, it’s a brief 47 pages and a quick read.

In the ebook’s introduction, Sean makes the case that in order for God to bless us financially, we need to follow all the financial wisdom in Scripture. In order to unlock the full potential of the Biblical Money Code in our lives, we must be fully obedient to all God’s wisdom, not just part. That won’t work.

Sean states that most people only follow some or part of the Biblical financial wisdom found in Scripture. Perhaps, they may tithe on a regular basis, but the rest of their financial life is a complete mess. Or, maybe they live a debt free lifestyle, but don’t tithe.

Sean drives home the point that a believer living in full obedience to each financial principle unlocks the full and complete blessing of God in the area of personal finances.

Here are the six Biblical financial principles that Sean focuses on:

  • Principle #1: Pray for God’s Favor and Blessing In Your Work.
  • Principle #2: Tithes and Offerings: 10% Plus Some, Not Just 10%.
  • Principle #3: Save Money and Reduce Your Debts
  • Principle #4: Invest for Your Future
  • Principle #5: Philanthropy
  • Principle #6: Being the Lender and Not the Borrower

My Take On The The Six Keys To Financial Success

I am of the personal opinion based on my own research PLUS personal experience that there is a “Biblical Money Code.” Is it some kind of big secret or something? No, of course not. But, the Bible does give us A LOT of common sense wisdom when it comes to handling money.

I do believe that God blesses complete obedience to His Word and His will. I also believe in the power of the Law of the Harvest. When you do the right things in the right order and in the right way, you will reap a bountiful harvest.

This is so very true in this area of personal finances. If you follow Biblical financial wisdom in every area (giving, saving, spending, debt, and investing), then God will bless you. You will reap what you have sown.

BUT, I would be hard pressed to say that this will happen every time for every person in every situation, though.

God is God, and He does not always conform to the box that we place Him in. He may allow negative financial circumstances into our lives, even if we may be following this “Biblical Money Code.”

Why would God allow this to happen, though, if we’re playing by these Biblical money rules?

It’s always difficult to pinpoint a definitive answer. We may never know this side of heaven. Perhaps God is teaching us an important spiritual lesson. Maybe He wants us to learn to rely on Him, rather than money. Or, maybe, He wants us to learn a lesson in controlling our emotions and growing in the virtue of patience.

I believe the key is remaining open to growth in your life when your expectations aren’t met, even when you are doing all the right things. But, don’t give up, though. Keep on doing all the right things in spite of the circumstances. There will be a tremendous payoff, eventually. Remain obedient, teachable, and press through to the end!

Questions: Do you believe in a Biblical Money Code? Why or why not? Have you experienced the Law of the Harvest in your personal finances from following these principles?






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Does God Really Want Me To Live A Life Of Financial Abundance Or Not?

Photo by DavidZ

Photo by DavidZ

Answering A Young Christian’s Financial Concerns

Is it okay to be a Christian and be rich?

Great question.

A few weeks ago, I received an email from one of my blog readers. She is new to the Christian faith and wrestling with wealth and the Christian life. You see, she lacks nothing in this life. She’s uncertain about what the Biblical response should be to the financial blessing of God.

In this post, I attempt to tackle ten questions that my blog reader asks in her email.

Before I answer these questions, take a quick scan of her email:

Hi Larry,

I recently found your blog and find it very interesting. I am a “born-again” Christian (since 2012) and found that no one wants to talk about money. Consequently, I am very thankful for your blog. I have a question and I’m wondering if you already addressed this topic:

Should I feel guilty that I do not lack anything?

I consider myself to be pretty generous. I cheerfully pay my 10% to the church and contribute to many charities. On the other hand….I do not lack anything. Sometimes, I feel guilty about the comfort that my family enjoys. Simply put, how can I justify having anything above the minimum necessity of life while thousands are dying from starvation every single day? Aren’t Christians supposed to sacrifice their “comfort” for the good of others? Isn’t true that many early Christians sold everything they had to give to the poor? How much credit do you get when you give out of abundance without experiencing sacrifice?

I recently started questioning expenses such as new clothing, new furniture, going to the movies and even family vacations! If I can’t hardly justify these, never mind considering real luxury items such as spa treatments, Botox, 10 pairs of shoes and a fancy car!

Anyone else experiencing this guilt and questioning every expense? Am I worrying too much about this? Should I forget it since after all, my contribution will not put an end to starvation? Did God want us to live a life of “sacrifices”? Is it wrong to enjoy earthly pleasures while others are dying? Is it wrong to not lack anything?

Your thoughts would be appreciated,

God bless,

Blog Reader from Alberta, Canada

A Biblical Response To Wealth

Here is my response to my reader’s specific questions based upon what I believe God teaches us through His Word. I attempt to quote a key Bible passage for each question.

  1. Should I feel guilty that I do not lack anything? To be blunt – NO! If God has chosen to bless you and your family, then I say REJOICE! Approach Him daily with a an attitude of gratitude for His financial blessings. You also mentioned that you are cheerfully tithing and giving to others. Your blessing and financial generosity should result in thanksgiving, not guilt! “Now he who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will also supply and increase your store of seed and will enlarge the harvest of your righteousness. You will be enriched in every way so that you can be generous on every occasion, and through us your generosity will result in thanksgiving to God” (2 Corinthians 9:10-11).
  2. How can I justify having anything above the minimum necessity of life while thousands are dying from starvation every single day? There’s a Gospel story (The Alabaster Jar) found in Matthew 26 and Mark 14 when a woman (probably Mary Magdalene) took a very expensive perfume/ointment that cost an entire year’s wages and poured it all over Jesus. She anointed His body before He went to the cross. The disciples were mad about it, too. Their response was “why couldn’t this expensive ointment been sold and the money given to the poor?” Jesus’ response, “The poor you will always have with you, and you can help them any time you want. But you will not always have me.” Yes, we need to help the poor, but there will be other large financial priorities that can and will supersede poverty. We will never be able to fully eradicate it. Jesus said so, Himself. Help where you can, and then leave the rest in God’s hands.
  3. Aren’t Christians supposed to sacrifice their “comfort” for the good of others? Yes and No. It’s a slightly complicated question. God’s first priority for you after the tithe is for you to provide for your family. “Anyone who does not provide for their relatives, and especially for their own household, has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever” (1 Timothy 5:8). Now, I do realize the passage is dealing with taking care of widows within your family so that they are not a burden on the church, but I still think there’s an overarching principle here. God gives us financial supply in order for us to provide for our families. But, if you and your spouse feel that you have way more than enough, then you could always make a decision to place a cap on your lifestyle and give the rest of your wealth away. There are no hard and fast rules here. You and your spouse just need to pray this one through and see what the Lord has called your family to do.
  4. Isn’t it true that many early Christians sold everything they had to give to the poor? You’re actually referring to the Book of Acts in this question (read Acts 2:42-47 and Acts 4:32-37). I believe this was an isolated incident in Scripture, completely based on the circumstances of the Early Church. The early church was being persecuted, and many of these young Christians were very poor. Apparently, they all threw their money together in a “communal pot” and took care of each other’s needs (not just poor people in general). Plus, these early believers thought Jesus was coming back sooner than later, so they didn’t really care about their wealth and what was going to happen to it. Unfortunately, some believers even stopped working and become idle in their lives as a result. In fact, the Apostle Paul had to chastise believers in Thessalonica about this very issue. Read 2 Thessalonians 3:6-14. As the church grew and matured, we no longer see this communal church living structure after the Book of Acts.
  5. Anyone else experiencing this guilt and questioning every expense? Many wealthy Christians struggle with these same questions as you do. You are not alone. My encouragement to you would be to embrace the struggle. That means the Holy Spirit is at work in your life. This is a great problem to have. Pray daily regarding what the Lord would have you do with your abundance.
  6. Am I worrying too much about this? Again, it’s a slightly complex problem you are dealing with, with no clear-cut answers to all of your questions. In Luke 12:25, Jesus poses the question, “Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to your life?” Instead of worrying about it, pray about these challenges and discuss them with your spouse. With God’s help, formulate a game plan for your abundance.
  7. Should I forget it since after all, my contribution will not put an end to starvation? I would say do what God has called you and your family to contribute, and then leave the rest in His hands. You can only do what you can do.
  8. Did God want us to live a life of “sacrifices?” At some level, I would say “yes.” If you have modified your lifestyle to the point where you are not spending money at the level you could based on your wealth, then I would submit that you are already living in a sacrificial state. “Sacrifice” has a different definition at different income levels. Your sacrifices won’t look like my sacrifices. This may be a horrible example, but let’s say you could financially afford and had a strong desire to buy a brand new 2014 Cadillac CTS with cash, but you have chosen to forego that purchase and buy a really nice, used, 2-year old 2012 Buck LaCrosse instead. And with the money you haven’t spent, you decide to give that to the poor. I believe then that you have lived out a sacrificial lifestyle.
  9. Is it wrong to enjoy earthly pleasures while others are dying? No. In 1 Timothy 6:17 we read, “Command those who are rich in this present world not to be arrogant nor to put their hope in wealth, which is so uncertain, but to put their hope in God, who richly provides us with everything for our enjoyment.” In this one verse, the Apostle Paul mentions that God does give wealth for our enjoyment. You and your spouse may just need to set the limits on that enjoyment through prayer and insight from the Holy Spirit.
  10. Is it wrong to not lack anything? No. Nowhere in Scripture do I read that it is wrong to lack anything. As a matter a fact, I read the opposite in God’s Word, at least in the sense of lacking real world, everyday needs such as food, clothing, and shelter. In Matthew 6:31-34 Jesus tells us, “So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.”

Questions: So, what do you think? Am I on the right track regarding Christians and wealth? How would you answer this blog reader’s questions?






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