Not Sure Where To Begin? Here’s The Starting Point For Christian Financial Stewardship

Photo by Kelvin Dickinson

Photo by Kelvin Dickinson

Making Plans

People have plans for lots of stuff in this life.

A woman who is about to be married spends hours flipping through wedding magazines, scanning websites, calling florists, and talking to caterers. She has a plan to create the most beautiful wedding known to mankind!

A professional executive in the workplace has a strategic plan and a daily task list. He has a plan to climb the corporate ladder and become a successful CEO one day.

Families often spend weeks planning out their ultimate summer vacation. Since they’re about to spend a lot of money, they want to get the biggest bang for their buck and have a great time.

But, these same people put together a financial plan? Are you kidding me? Nah, they would rather just shoot from the hip and roll the dice. They have thousands of dollars of income flowing into their bank account each month but have no desire to manage what is coming in. That’s too restrictive, constraining, and absolutely zero fun!

So, why do people spend so much time planning for special occasions such as weddings, vacations, or work projects but have no desire to put together a financial plan?

Because there is a sense of pressure and expectation for these other events.

A memorable wedding has high expectations all around it. The bride, groom, parents, family, and even close friends all have certain expectations wrapped up in a couple’s wedding ceremony.

A professional executive position has pressure and expectation from the first day he has been hired. This person is under the gun to perform at a high level to achieve success in their career not only for the company they work for, but also to provide for their family.

A big family vacation may only happen one time a year, but the parents and children all want the biggest return for their time and money. Plus, they want to outdo last year’s trip. They are expecting to have the time of their lives.

I find it interesting, though, that most people don’t put themselves under the same kind of pressure and expectation when it comes to money. And, I find it even more interesting that the majority of Christians have the very same mindset as the rest of the world.

But God has high expectations for those who claim the name of Christ to be excellent managers of money.

God and Money

So, why would God have high expectations for me and my financial life?

Because everything you have belongs to God in the first place. Your money, your house, your car, your career, your talents and abilities, your health, your spouse, and your children are all His, not yours. This is the starting point for an understanding of what Christian stewardship is all about.

“The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it;” (Psalm 24:1).

You may be thinking to yourself, “Now, Larry. I worked hard for all I have. I went to college for six years. I climbed the corporate ladder. I amassed all my earthly possessions. I found my spouse and we created children, together.”

Yes, that may all be true, but according to the above verse, God owns everything. And because He owns everything, He is expecting you as a Christian to be an excellent manager of His stuff.

“Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful” (I Corinthians 4:2).

Even Jesus taught His followers this principle in the Parable of the Bags of Gold in Matthew 25:14-30 (NIV):

“Again, it will be like a man going on a journey, who called his servants and entrusted his wealth to them. To one he gave five bags of gold, to another two bags, and to another one bag, each according to his ability. Then he went on his journey. The man who had received five bags of gold went at once and put his money to work and gained five bags more.  So also, the one with two bags of gold gained two more. But the man who had received one bag went off, dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s money.

“After a long time the master of those servants returned and settled accounts with them. The man who had received five bags of gold brought the other five. ‘Master,’ he said, ‘you entrusted me with five bags of gold. See, I have gained five more.’

“His master replied, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master’s happiness!’
“The man with two bags of gold also came. ‘Master,’ he said, ‘you entrusted me with two bags of gold; see, I have gained two more.’

“His master replied, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master’s happiness!’
“Then the man who had received one bag of gold came. ‘Master,’ he said, ‘I knew that you are a hard man, harvesting where you have not sown and gathering where you have not scattered seed. So I was afraid and went out and hid your gold in the ground. See, here is what belongs to you.’

“His master replied, ‘You wicked, lazy servant! So you knew that I harvest where I have not sown and gather where I have not scattered seed? Well then, you should have put my money on deposit with the bankers, so that when I returned I would have received it back with interest.

“‘So take the bag of gold from him and give it to the one who has ten bags. For whoever has will be given more, and they will have an abundance. Whoever does not have, even what they have will be taken from them. And throw that worthless servant outside, into the darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’

From this parable, we see three servants who had plans for the money that had been entrusted to them by their master. Two of the three got the money plan right. The third servant got it wrong. The two servants who got the money plan right were rewarded. The one who got their plan wrong was punished.

Are You Even At The Starting Point?

In this post, we have seen that there are two parts to the starting point for Biblical finances.

First, you must a have a plan. Having a casual approach to money accomplishes nothing. You have to a vision of what you absolutely need to accomplish with the financial resources you have been entrusted with.

Second (and most importantly), you must acknowledge that God own everything that you have – your time, energy, health, relationships, abilities, and, of course, money. As a child of God, He is expecting you to manage His stuff with excellence.

Question: Do you have a financial plan and have you acknowledged that God is the owner of all He has asked you to manage?

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